This is how I love you

I give my love to you
Through ragged puffs of breath
Through arching backs
And grasping hands
And shaking arms and legs

I give my love to you
Through moans of staggered breath
Through pouting lips
And clenching fists
And trickling drops of sweat

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37 thoughts on “This is how I love you

  1. Of course I loved how sensuous this is…but even more, I love the poem of the soul, written in invisible ink, between each line, saying the things there that the body only can mutely strain at like a person with no tongue…

  2. Stuber Haiku* Labeled “Dad”

    Simple meals
    with scrumptious drinks made
    up his restaurant
    fare. “Pocahontas” was cheese
    and bacon

    on a split
    hotdog, washed down
    with root beer.
    Vegetables were fries
    or fresh onion rings, causing

    many smiles,
    future diet plans.
    Today’s smile, decades
    later, is at reunions
    short but sweet.

    Much water
    over many dams
    means we pray
    daily, move to strong
    tomorrows, spurred by writing,

    reading; large
    ideas continue to
    refine thoughts
    so you or we might
    say the exact right

    phrase, sentence,
    paragraph that will stick in
    brains so full,
    hearts so swelled, lives with
    little room for more.

    *The “Stuber Haiku” has an A,B,A,B, C,C stanza pattern in which the syllables per line are variable in stanzas A and B (but obviously the same in A and B) and the C stanzas are always 3, 7, 3, 5, 5 in syllables-per-line. “A” here is 3,5,5,7,3 and “B” is 3,5,3,5,7. Many of these have been written in the past. The choice of odd numbered syllables is a nod to Japanese Haiku, best written in Japanese, consisting of only three lines in a 5, 7, 5 pattern. Haikus almost always mention nature AND the seasons or a season, or the change of seasons in some way. Some linguists say 7 syllables of Japanese = roughly 12 in English.

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